Time has been a topic on my mind since March. My time was packed and free time was rare, but then suddenly, quarantine cleared my schedule and I had nothing but free time. Yet, looking back, the past few months have felt super busy too.
 
Trying to figure out what to do with our time, or perceived lack of time is one of the biggest root problems I personally experience and hear about from BESTies regarding their training and nutrition habits.
 
The paradox is that time is the most consistent thing. You and I have the same 24 hours in our days as Mother Theresa and Steve Jobs did. Time only goes in one direction, and it doesn’t stop for anyone, yet we still run out of it – especially free time.
 
Free time is supposed to be FREE or freeing. It is supposed to be available to do – or not do – anything you want. Yet, we blink and it’s gone!
 
I think the key to the problem is this: We do not plan our free time.
 
Instead, when we get free time, we shut off – letting time wasters take the reigns. We get unfocused and mentally disengage with responsibilities and things that restore us physically, mentally, and emotionally; we become reactive rather than proactive and we call it rest.
 
So before we know it, our free time is gone, we’re back to saying we’re too busy, or we’ll start next week.We feel overwhelmed and exhausted and start dreaming of our next break.
 
In that “free” time (cough-cough: enslaved time) no real changes were made to our health and nutrition, and all that stuff we slapped the label “rest” on actually led you to feel frustrated because nothing we did made us feel better – physically, mentally, or emotionally.
 
I’m under the impression freedom and rest should make us feel good. Right?!
 
In order to have more time that feels freeing we have to purposefully schedule those things that increase our sense of responsibility, physical health, mental health and emotional health.
 
Paradoxically, if we want to be spontaneous and free, then we will actually need a plan and boundaries that grant us the freedom to feel and act that way.
 
Maybe in a nutshell, you will resonate with an old’ cliche: Failing to plan is planning to fail. It’s and old cliche, so it must be right! ; )
 
Planning and scheduling carefully is the first step in any training, nutrition, or common behavior change goal.
 

Love ya,

Zack

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